Corrections & Retractions

Corrections

A Correction notice will be issued when it is necessary to correct an error or omission which can impact the interpretation of the article, but where the scholarly integrity of the article remains intact. Examples include mislabeling of a figure, missing key information on funding, or competing interests of the authors.

The Government Journal distinguishes between major and minor errors. For correction notices, major errors or omissions are considered to be any changes that impact the interpretation of the article, but where the scholarly integrity of the article remains intact.

  • All major errors are accompanied by a separate correction notice. The correction notice should provide clear details of the error and the changes that have been made to the Version of Record. Under these circumstances, The Government Journal will:

  • Correct the online article.
  • Issue a separate correction notice electronically linked back to the corrected version.
  • Add a footnote to the article displaying the electronic link to the correction notice.
  • Paginate and make available the correction notice in the online issue of the journal.
  • Make the correction notice free to view.
  • Any minor errors will not be accompanied by a separate correction notice. Instead, a footnote will be added to the article detailing to the reader that the article has been corrected. Minor errors do not impact the reliability of, or the reader’s understanding of, the scholarly content.

Retractions

A Retraction notice will be issued where a major error (e.g. in the analysis or methods) invalidates the conclusions in the article, or where research misconduct or publication misconduct has taken place (e.g. research without required ethical approvals, fabricated data, manipulated images, plagiarism, duplicate publication, etc). The decision to issue a retraction for an article will be made in accordance with Journal Policies and will involve an investigation by the editorial staff in collaboration with the editor. Authors and institutions may request a retraction of their articles if their reasons meet the criteria for retraction.<br/.> Retraction will be considered:

  • If the findings have previously been published elsewhere without proper cross-referencing, permission, or justification (e.g. cases of redundant publication or duplicate publication).

  • If the research constitutes plagiarism.
  • Where there is evidence of fraudulent authorship.
  • Where there is evidence of compromised peer review.
  • If there is evidence of unethical research.

Where the decision has been taken to retract an article The Government Journal will:

  • Add a “retracted” watermark to the Published Version of Record of the article.
  • Issue a separate retraction statement, titled ‘Retraction: [article title]’, that will be linked to the retracted article.
  • Paginate and make available the retraction statement in the online issue of the journal